Health News

CDC Says Avoid Romaine Lettuce from California: What to Know

  • Romaine lettuce is being recalled due to an Escherichia coli (E. coli) outbreak that’s left 40 people sick across 16 statesTrusted Source.

  • The lettuce tested positive for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 — a strain that causes diarrhea and vomiting.

  • This E.coli strain has been associated with multiple outbreaks that occurred in 2017 and 2018Trusted Source from contaminated salad and lettuce products.

Health officials have announced a massive recall of romaine lettuce due to an Escherichia coli (E. coli) outbreak that’s left 40 people sick across 16 statesTrusted Source.

The lettuce was tested by the Maryland Department of Health, which found the lettuce tested positive for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 — a strain that causes diarrhea and vomiting.

The Centers for Disease Control and PreventionTrusted Source (CDC) is advising people not to eat any lettuce harvested in or around Salinas, California. If you have romaine lettuce at home and are unsure where it came from, it’s best to play it safe and toss it.

“This advice includes all types of romaine lettuce harvested from Salinas, California such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and packages of precut lettuce and salad mixes which contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad,” the CDC stated last week.

1 in 8 People with Heart Conditions Avoid or Ration Meds Due to Cost

  • Many people with heart disease report not taking their medications as prescribed because of concerns about cost.

  • A new study found that 1 in 8 people who have a heart condition are rationing or avoiding their medications.

  • This can actually cost more in the long run if they end up back in the hospital.

  • One in eight people who’ve had a heart attack or other cardiovascular condition don’t take their medications as prescribed, new research shows.

  • In the new study, researchers found that people saved money on prescription drugs by skipping doses, delaying refills, or taking less than the prescribed dose.

  • This kind of cost-related rationing of medication can dramatically increase a person’s risk of having another heart attack, stroke, or other cardiovascular event.

  • Medication rationing or avoidance can even cost a patient more money, since it can lead to higher healthcare costs down the road if people end up at the emergency room or hospitalized, or need more frequent doctor’s appointments.

  • Dr. Deborah Levine, MPH, a general internist and researcher at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, said these results confirm what’s been seen in earlier studies, including her 2018 study of stroke survivorsTrusted Source.

  • “Many Americans are struggling to afford their medications, and in many cases forgoing their medications or rationing them,” said Levine, who wasn’t involved in the new study. “As a result, they’re experiencing preventable health complications.”

ACA Health Care Enrollment Event

​On Monday, November 25, from 5-7PM, we will be hosting a free ACA health care enrollment event at the University of Pittsburgh Community Engagement Center at 622 N. Homewood Ave. If you're not covered by your employer, stop by and meet with navigators and experts to update your plan or find one that works for you. Please bring a W2 or pay stub and ID.

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